Kilcash Castle

Kilcash Castle once occupied by Lord Castlehaven, a noted Confederate Catholic commander in the 1641-52 war, wrote his Memoirs here.

Kilcash Castle

Kilcash Castle once occupied by Lord Castlehaven, a noted Confederate Catholic commander in the 1641-52 war, wrote his Memoirs here. The early 19th century song Cill Chais mourns the death of Margaret Butler, Viscountess Iveagh. Margaret Butler married Colonel Thomas Butler of Kilcash Castle after the death of her first husband.

Near the castle are the remains of a medieval church with a Romanesque doorway. This building was partially repaired in the 1980s and is now safe to visit. In the graveyard, the mausoleum (a building nearly as large as the church) contains the tombs of Archbishop Christopher Butler (1673–1757), Margaret, Viscountess Iveagh (see below), Walter Butler, the 16th Earl of Ormond (d. 1773) and John Butler, the 17th Earl (d. 1795).[1] Some of the eighteenth-century headstones are carved with elaborate scenes of the crucifixion

Cill Cháis (Kilcash) was the great house of one of the branches of the Butlers near Clonmel, Co. Tipperary, until well into the eighteenth century.

The Castle of Kilcash is situated at the foot of Sliabh na mBan, not far from Kilsheelan. It was one of the chief seats of the Butler family. A note in Duffy's "Poets and Poetry of Munster" states that the song is the composition of a student named Lane, who was educated for the priesthood by Lady Iveagh, the deagh-bhean (good lady) of the song.
The song in its entirety runs to seven stanzas of eight lines each, and may be found in the "Poets and Poetry" with a metrical translation by Mangan.

Location: 
Kilcash
Tipperary
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